Book Review: The Power is Within You by Louise Hay

BookReviewClub.com

An inspiring self-help metaphysical book for everyone seeking something within that would make life meaningful and powerful.

Louise Hay has been helping people with metaphysical advice for more than 30 years, and she is getting stronger. This book shows you what your past can do to the present and the future, how to control your mind, so it does not control you, and how to take responsibility in our lives. It provides a compass to those who are temporarily lost in the turmoil of life.

Another successful book by the author. It simply opens minds and hearts. Powerful.

— A book review by BookReviewClub.com

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction, Self-Help
Publisher: Hay House
Publish Date: December 1, 1991
Pages: 256
Review Date: January 31, 2017
Author’s Site: LouiseHay.com

Book Review: Teach and Grow Rich by Danny Iny

BookReviewClub.com

A no-nonsense, clear account of what it means to teach and grow rich today.

Formal education has been criticized for being too slow to adapt to the rapidly-changing business landscape. Business and other soft skills learned today in universities may not be applicable tomorrow, which rendered paying tens of thousands of dollars in tuition an empty promise.

With this “fat tail” premise, Danny Iny argues that with the right applicable super-specific skills, any entrepreneur can help people while also making a good amount of money. It is not a get-rich book nor a book promising a million dollar, but it is an eye-opener that can be used as a point of reference to start teaching online with your existing skills.

A strong book with a strong premise for those with entrepreneurial inclination.

— A book review by BookReviewClub.com

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction, Entrepreneurship
Publisher: Mirasee
Publish Date: January 11, 2017
Pages: 169
Review Date: January 31, 2017
Author’s Site: Mirasee.com

Book Review: Declutter Your Mind: How to Stop Worrying, Relieve Anxiety, and Eliminate Negative Thinking by S.J. Scott and Barrie Davenport

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A concise read for self-help enthusiasts from two best-selling authors.

Living a modern lifestyle can be quite hectic and overwhelming, as information overload and negativity constantly bombard our mind. Anxiety, worries, stress, frustrations, and being overwhelmed are signs of mind clutter, which can be solved by adopting the right mindsets, habits, and actions. This book is divided into four sections: decluttering thoughts, decluttering life obligations, decluttering relationships, and decluttering surroundings. Each section comes with scientific explanations, solutions, anecdotes, and exercises to help readers decluttering their mind. Well structured, authoritative and written in straightforward, clear, and friendly tone, this book is packed with applicable recommendations to try immediately. Both S.J. Scott and Barrie Davenport are multiple-book best-selling authors.

A clear, practical, and well-researched concise self-help book for those with limited reading time yet want to learn potent ways to declutter mind.

— A book review by BookReviewClub.com

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction, Self-Help
Publisher: CreateSpace
Publish Date: August 23, 2016
Pages: 156
Review Date: January 16, 2017
Author’s Site: DevelopGoodHabits.com

Book Review: When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

BookReviewClub.com

The memoir of an idealist neurosurgeon who was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer at 36 gains poignancy from deep reflections on mortality and existence.

After a long study of medicine and specializing in neuroscience, English literature graduate Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with lung cancer that has metastasized. The diagnosis came as a shock and left him with a profound identity crisis. Being a strong physician, now he was left being a patient and being a strong pastoral figure, he was a sheep. A devoted Christian, medicine was not merely a job, it was a calling that provided an answer to his metaphysical questions. His profession defined who he was, and he had not lived to the fullest during the training as a neurosurgeon. Now that he was finally ready, he was preparing to die.

A strong and poignant memoir by a polymath whose deep thoughts can move mountains and readers’ hearts. True lessons about living from a dying man.

— A book review by BookReviewClub.com.

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction, Memoir
Publisher: Random House
Publish Date: January 12, 2016
Pages: 256
Reviewed: January 16, 2017
Author’s Site: Paul Kalanithi

Book Review: Daddy’s Little Princess by Cathy Glass

BookReviewClub.com

The journal of a foster carer to a girl who had an emotional incest with her father while the foster carer herself was experiencing divorce.

Cathy Glass is a prolific author with several memoirs as a foster carer. Unlike her other books, this book had two intertwined story lines. The primary story was about a girl named Beth whose father had a mental breakdown and was hospitalized. During the hospitalization, Beth was cared by Glass. Both Beth and her father Derek had a lot of love between, so much so that it looked “inappropriate” to others, including to Glass and Marianne, Derek’s girlfriend. The other story line was about Glass’ “always working” husband who eventually divorced her for another woman. The writing style is straightforward, detailed, and clear.

A detailed account of foster caring an emotionally abused girl and the low point of a marriage due to infidelity. Two poignant lessons of love: don’t love too much and be yourself.

— A book review by BookReviewClub.com.

Book Details:

Genre: Non-fiction, Memoir
Publisher: Harper Element
Publish Date: March 27, 2014
Pages: 304
Review Date: January 16, 2017
Author’s Site: CathyGlass.co.uk

Book Review: Choose Yourself! Be Happy, Make Millions, Live the Dream by James Altucher

BookReviewClub.com

James Altucher is a brave man. Very brave. He’s a confident self-made entrepreneur who was ready to make a change in his life. And he did. He was unsure, but he has passed that period and is now enjoying being in his own skin.

I have a similar life and business philosophy: creating my own pathway and making my own mark. I don’t wait for someone to pick me and make me a CEO. I started my own company and produced the products to be sold.

Being an entrepreneur is like driving on a freeway. It is fast and furious. Sometimes you’d need to accelerate so fast that the view becomes blurry; sometimes you’d need to slow down so much that you’d stop. Either way, it takes courage and acceptance. To maintain sanity.

Both Altucher and I have similar thoughts and ideas. Perhaps we can even be good friends. For sure, I can learn a lot from this curly-haired geek. Choose Yourself! is a good book to read.

— A review by BookReviewClub.com

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction, Self-Help
Publisher: CreateSpace
Publish Date: June 3, 2013
Pages: 274
Review Date: June 18, 2013
Author’s Site: JamesAltucher.com

 

Book Review: Seven Men and the Secret of Their Greatness by Eric Metaxas

BookReviewClub.com

In this time and age, we need heroes and role models to learn from. As author Eric Metaxas said, “This book doesn’t talk about manhood but shows the actual lives of great men.” Seven extraordinary men discussed were George Washington, William Wilberforce, Eric Liddell, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Jackie Robinson, Pope John Paul II, and Charles W. Colson. They were “men” of men. They were men who were more than mere “manhood,” for they embodied ideal men, ideal fathers.

These seven men where selected by author Metaxas for they had shown heroism, chivalry, righteousness, courage, and selflessness. Above all, these men trusted God with their whole hearts. They showed “true fatherhood,” despite three of them had no children of their own, even two were unmarried. These men were some of the greatest men ever lived, despite their personal and circumstantial shortcomings.

As a child who grew up without a father, these great men would serve as my lost father figure. Their existence confirmed that humanity is not as bad as TV news has been depicting. There are good, even great, men out there. We just need to know where to look. Such as this inspiring and comforting book.

[I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own. This review was published on BookReviewClub.com.]

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Publish Date: April 30, 2013
Pages: 221
Review Date: June 3, 2013
Author’s Site: EricMetaxas.com

Book Review: Think Happy, Be Happy by Workman Publishing

BookReviewClub.com

This 400-page gift book is such a charmer. The pages are colorful and filled with quotes from famous people, short passages about happiness-related things, playlists of happy songs, cute drawings, whimsical names, and other feeling-awesome snippets of life and love. This book serves an important purpose: reminding readers to be happy by thinking about happy things. Happiness, after all, is all in the mind and heart.

I have never read such a beautiful book, yet simple and down-to-earth as if it was created just for me. It’s a perfect book to give to friends and ourselves. It’s a special book to treasure for many years to come.

— A book review by BookReviewClub.com

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction
Publisher: Workman Publishing
Publish Date: October 8, 2013
Pages: 400
Review Date: May 11, 2013
Author’s Site: Workman Publishing

Book Review: Tiger Writing: Art, Culture and the Interdependent Self by Gish Jen

BookReviewClub.co

In Tiger Writing, a memoir of art, culture, and interdependent self, author Gish Jen said, “Culture is not fate; it only offers templates, which individuals can finally accept, reject, or modify, and do.” Jen was born in the United States of immigrant parents who migrated from Yixing in Jiangsu province, west of Shanghai. The memoir is divided into three sections, which were presented as lectures at Massey Lectures in the History of American Civilization program at Harvard. It is a cultural memoir filled with beautiful passages of Chinese-American diaspora.

In narrative format, the author showed the readers how American culture glorifies “independent,” while Chinese culture is “interdependent.”

In the first section, her father’s memoir was the primary focus. Unlike American memoirs, which are filled with details of personal affairs and private thoughts, Mr. Jen’s focuses on things he saw and experienced, such as intriguing architectural and interior designs and where generations of family members received the character for their middle name. In the second section, Gish discussed the differences between European-Americans and Asian-Americans in terms of self portrayals. Individuals in the first group are more self-focused than those in the second group. In the third section, the author included critical analyses of the two cultures and how scientific studies and anecdotes from literary works made sense in the life of the author’s –a novelist’s.

It’s a memoir of diaspora unlike others, for it is also a vivid comparison of two cultures and the collision of two philosophies of self –independence and interdependence. In this memoir, readers can clearly sense Gish Jen’s joy and anguish caught in the diaspora. Beautiful and clever.

–A book review by BookReviewClub.com

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction, Memoir
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Publish Date: March 2013
Pages: 224
Review Date: May 9, 2013
Author’s Site: GishJen.com

Book Review: Is College Worth It? by William J. Bennett and David Wilezol

BookReviewClub.com

The premise of this book is, “The world’s most talented students will be successful no matter where they go to college or if they don’t go at all” (location 123 in the e-book version). Overturning the commonly held belief that everyone should go to college, the authors believe that not everyone should go to college. Success isn’t determined by the degrees one amasses, but by having the right skills and the right knowledge for the job at a certain time.

According to the Census Bureau and Department of Labor that more than 54 percent of recent college graduates were unemployed and underemployed, the belief that a college graduate earns $1 million more than a high school graduate is a myth. Today’s skyrocketing tuition fees of higher education create an unprecedented bubble of student loans, while at the same time college graduates’ earning power diminishes.

The authors, however, didn’t totally disregard the value of college education. They argued that certain majors and certain top universities are still worth pursuing and worth the escalating student loans. Top majors to pursue included petroleum engineering, aerospace engineering, actuarial mathematics, and chemical engineering and top schools worthy of the high tuition fees included Caltech, Harvey Mudd, and MIT. They also discussed the reasons behind the high cost of education and why it has been turning out to be monstrous.

This book is current and provides detailed analysis on how student debts have been an overlooked financial bubble ready to explode. The myths surrounding education, the education system, the lenders, the financial aid system, and the society’s expectation out of college graduates have caused the current mess. It also provided a solid argument on why a college education is not for everyone and that the society doesn’t need too many college graduates.

Overall, this book confirms my own hypothesis and provides an enlightening perspective on what matters most for high school graduates.

[I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own. This review was published on BookReviewClub.com.]

Book Details:

Genre: Non-Fiction
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
Publish Date: April 30, 2013
Pages:
Review Date: May 9, 2013
Author’s Site: BillBennett.com